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The Continental Congress’ Declaration of Rights and Grievances
Digital History ID 4116


Date:1765

Annotation: The Continental Congress' Declaration of Rights and Grievances.


Document: We have several times promised to treat our readers with a correct copy of this venerable manuscript, detailing the first movements of the friends of freedom in the new world. It is an official copy, under the signature of John Cotton, Esq. clerk to that illustrious body; and, we have reason to believe, the only one extant. It was handed to the editor by his much respected friend, Caesar A. Rodney, Esq., of Delaware, who found it among the papers of his late revered uncle, the estimable and patriotic Caesar Rodney, one of the delegates, and for many years the great prop and stay of Whiggism in the lower parts of his native state. On a loose piece of paper, in the manuscript book, is a list of the members, with which we have preceded the journal itself, in the hand writing of Mr. C. R. We are thus particular to shew the entire authenticity of the document: which, we are informed, many of our sages have sought for in vain.

In this journal the reader will not find any thing to astonish or surprise him; but there is much to admire. In every line he will discover a spirit of decision and firmness totally irreconcilable with a state of servitude, and highly worthy of imitation at the present day. The difficulties the people encountered in forming this congress, unknown to the laws and opposed by the Royalists invested with power, are honorable to their cause and its agents. With an eye steadily fixed on freedom, they cast behind them the cold maxims of prudence, and nobly resolved to systematize an opposition to the growing tyranny of the "mother country." They did so, and therein generated a spirit of union, that finally brought about the independence of these states, and led to the establishment of our present happy constitution.--Niles’ Weekly Register, of July 25, 1812.

DELEGATES TO THE CONGRESS OF 1765

Massachusetts James Otis, Oliver Partridge,

Timothy Ruggles. Rhode Island Metcalf Bowler, Henry Ward. Connecticut Eliphalet Dyer, David Rowland,

William S. Johnson. New York Robert R. Livingston, John Cruger,

Philip Livingston,

William Bayard,

Leonard Lispenard. New Jersey Robert Ogden, Hendrick Fisher,

Joseph Borden. Pennsylvania John Dickenson, John Morton,

George Bryan. Delaware Thomas M’Kean, Caesar Rodney. Maryland William Murdock, Edward Tilghman,

Thomas Ringgold. South Carolina Thomas Lynch, Christopher Gadsden,

John Rutledge.

New Hampshire, Were not represented in this Virginia, congress. But their assemblies North Carolina, and wrote that they would agree to Georgia, whatever was done by the congress.

THE JOURNAL

Boston, June, 1765

Sir—The house of representatives of this province, in the present session of general court, have unanimously agreed to propose a meeting, as soon as may be, of committees from the houses of representatives or burgesses, of the several British colonies on this continent, to consult together on the present circumstances of the colonies, and the difficulties to which they are and must be reduced by the operation of the acts of parliament, for levying duties and taxes on the colonies; and to consider of a general and united, dutiful, loyal and humble representation of their condition to his majesty and to the parliament, and to implore relief.

The house of representatives of this province have also voted, to propose that such meeting be at the city of New York, in the province of New York, on the first Tuesday in October next, and have appointed the committee of three of their members to attend that service, with such as the other houses of representatives or burgesses, in the several colonies, may think fit to appoint to meet them: and the committee of the house of representatives of this province, are directed to repair to the said New York, on the first Tuesday in October next, accordingly: if, therefore your honorable house should agree to this proposal, it would be acceptable, that as early notice of it as possible might be transmitted to the speaker of the house of representatives of this province.

SAMUEL WHITE, Speaker.

In consequence of the foregoing circular letter, the following gentlemen met at New York, in the province of New York, on Monday, the 7th of October, 1765, viz:

From the province of Massachusetts Bay JAMES OTIS, OLIVER PARTRIDGE, and

TIMOTHY RUGGLES, Esqrs.

Who produced their appointment as follows, viz:

To James Otis, Oliver Partridge, and Timothy Ruggles, Esquires.

Gentlemen,—The house of representatives of this province, have appointed you a committee to meet at New York on the first Tuesday in October next, such committees as the other houses of representatives or burgesses in the several colonies on this continent, may think fit to appoint, to consult together on the present circumstances of the colonies, on the difficulties to which they are, and must be reduced by the operation of the late acts of parliament. By this choice, the house has reposed in you a trust of singular importance, and have just reason to expect you will give your utmost attention to it. In case you should receive advice that the houses of representatives or burgesses of the other colonies, or any of them, agree to such committees, to join you in this interesting affair, you are directed to repair to New York at the time appointed, and endeavor to unite with them in sentiment. and agree upon such representations, as may tend to preserve our rights and privileges. And it is the opinion of this house, that no address or representation shall be esteemed the act of this house, unless it is agreed to and signed by the major part of their committee.

If it should be said, that we are in any manner represented in parliament, you must by no means concede to it; it is an opinion which this house cannot see the least reason to adopt.

Further, the house think that such a representation of the colonies as British subjects are to enjoy, would be attended with the greatest difficulty, if it is not absolutely impracticable, and therefore, you are not to urge or consent to any proposal for any representation, if such be made in the congress.

It is the expectation of the house, that a most loyal and dutiful address to his majesty and the parliament, will be prepared by the congress, praying as well for the removal of the grievances the colonies labor under at present, as for preventing others for the future; which petitions, if drawn up, as far as you shall be able to judge, agreeable to the mind of the house, you are empowered to sign and forward; and you are to lay a copy of the same before this house, and make report of your proceedings upon your return.

It is the hearty prayer of this house, that the congress may be endued with that wisdom which is from above, and that their councils and determinations may be attended with the divine blessing.

SAMUEL WHITE, Speaker.

From the colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations METCALF BOWLER, and HENRY WARD, Esqrs.

Who produced the following appointment, viz:

By the honorable SAMUEL WARD, governor, captain general and commander-in-chief of and over the English colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations in New England in America.

To Metcalf Bowler and to Henry Ward. esquires,

GREETING:

Whereas, the general assembly of this province have nominated and appointed you, the same Metcalf Bowler and Henry Ward, to be commissioners in behalf of this colony to meet such commissioners as are or shall be appointed by the other British governments in North America, to meet at New York the first Tuesday of October next,

I do, therefore, hereby authorize and empower, and commissionate you, the said Metcalf Bowler and Henry Ward, forthwith to repair to New York, and there, in behalf of this colony, to meet and join with the other commissioners in consulting together on the present circumstances of the colonies, and the difficulties to which they are and must be reduced by the operation of the act of parliament for levying duties and taxes upon the colonies; and to consider of a general and united, dutiful, loyal and humble representation to his majesty and the parliament, and to implore relief. And you are also hereby empowered to conclude and agree with the other commissioners, upon such measures as you shall think necessary and proper for obtaining redress of the grievances of the colonies, agreeably to the instructions given you by the general assembly of this colony.

Given under my hand and the seal of the said colony, this sixteenth day of September, 1765 and in the fifth year of his majesty’s reign.

SAMUEL WARD

By his honor’s command.

HENRY WARD, Secretary.

From the colony of Connecticut ELIPHALET DYER, DAVID ROWLAND, and

WM. SAML. JOHNSON, Esqrs.

Who produced the following appointment, viz:

At a general assembly of the governor and company of the colony of Connecticut, holden at Hartford, by special order of his honor the governor of said colony, on the nineteenth day of September, Anno Dom. 1765.

Whereas, it has been proposed that a congress be attended. by commissioners from the several governments on this continent, to confer upon a general, united, humble, loyal and dutiful representation to his majesty and the parliament, of the present circumstances of the colonies and the difficulties to which they are and must be reduced by the operation of the acts of parliament for laying duties and taxes on the colonies, and to implore relief.

Resolved by this assembly, That Eliphalet Dyer, David Rowland, and William Samuel Johnson, esqrs., or any two of them, be, and are hereby appointed commissioners, on behalf of this colony, to repair to New York to attend the proposed congress, in the matters above referred to; and his honor is hereby desired to commissionate them accordingly.

A true copy, examined by

GEORGE WYLLYS, Secretary.

At a general assembly of the governor and company of the colony of Connecticut, holden at Hartford, by special order of his honor the governor of the said colony, on the 19th day of September, Anno Dom. 1765.

Instructions to the commissioners of this colony, appointed to meet commissioners from the other colonies at New York, on the first Tuesday of October next:

Gentlemen.—You are to repair to the said city of New York, at the said time, or at the time which according to the intelligence you may receive of the convening of the other commissioners, it may appear to you seasonable and best, to consult together with them on the present circumstances of the colonies, and the difficulties to which they are and must be reduced, by the operation of the acts of parliament for levying duties and taxes on the colonies, and to consider of and prepare a general and united, dutiful, loyal and humble representation of their condition to his majesty and the parliament, and to implore relief, etc. In your proceedings you are to take care that you form no such junction with the other commissioners as will subject you to the major vote of the commissioners present.

You are to inform the governor and general assembly at the sessions in October next, of all such proceedings, as appear to you needful and convenient to be communicated for consideration; and to observe all such further instructions as you may receive; and you are to report your doings with the doings of the commissioners at such meeting, to the general assembly of this colony for acceptance and approbation.

A true copy, examined by

GEORGE WYLLYS, Secretary.

THOMAS FITCH, Esquire, governor and commander in chief of his majesty’s colony of Connecticut in New-England, in America,

To Eliphalet Dyer, David Rowland, and William Samuel Johnson, esquires,

GREETING:

Whereas, the general assembly of the said colony of Connecticut, at their session holden at Hartford on the nineteenth day of this instant, September, nominated and appointed you, or any two of you, to be commissioners on behalf of this colony, to repair to New-York to attend a congress proposed to be held there by commissioners from the several governments on this continent, to confer upon a general and united, loyal, humble and dutiful representation to his majesty and the parliament, of the present circumstances of the colonies, and the difficulties to which they are and must be reduced by the operation of the acts of parliament, for levying duties and taxes on the colonies, and to implore relief, etc. and have desired me to commission you accordingly.

I do therefore, reposing a special trust and confidence in your loyalty, ability and good conduct, hereby constitute, and authorize and commission the said Eliphalet Dyer, David Rowland and William Samuel Johnson, esquires, or any two of you, for and on behalf of this colony, to repair to the said city of New York on the first day of October next, or at the time which, according to the intelligence you may receive of the convening of the other commissioners, may appear to you seasonable and best, to confer and consult with them or such of them as shall be present upon and convening, the matters and things before mentioned, for the purposes aforesaid; wherein you are to observe such instructions as you have received, or shall further receive from the general assembly of the said colony of Connecticut, agreeable to the important trust reposed in you.

Given under my hand, and the public seal of said colony of Connecticut, within the same the twenty-first day of September, in the fifth year of the reign of our sovereign lord George the third, of Great Britain, France and Ireland king, defender of the faith, etc. Anno Domini, one thousand seven hundred and sixty-five.

THOMAS FITCH.

By his honor’s command

GEORGE WYLLYS, secretary.

From the colony of New York ROBERT R. LIVINGSTON, JOHN CRUGER,

PHILIP LIVINGSTON,

WILLIAM BAYARD, and

LEONARD LISPENARD, Esqrs.

Appeared, and informed the congress that since the above letter from the speaker of the house of representatives of Massachusetts Bay the general assembly of New-York have not had an opportunity of meeting, but that they confidently expect, from the general sense of the people, and such of the representatives as they have had an opportunity of speaking to that when the assembly does meet, (which will be probably very soon) the congress will be approved, and a regular committee for the purpose appointed; in the mean time they think themselves in some measure authorized to meet the congress, by the following vote, viz:

Extract from the votes and proceedings of the general assembly of the colony of New York.

DIE SABATI, 9h, A. M. the 4th April, 1761.

Mr. Speaker represented to this house, that his situation in the country rendered it vastly inconvenient to him alone to correspond with the agent of this colony, at the court of Great Britain, and more especially so, during the recess of the house.

Ordered, That the members of the city of New York, or the major part of them, be a committee of correspondence to correspond with the agent of this colony at the court of Great Britain during the recess of the house, concerning the public affairs of this colony; and that they lay before the house copies of all such letters as they may write to him, and also all such letters and advices as they may receive from him respecting the same.

DIE JOVIS, 9h, A. M. 9th December, 1762.

Alderman Livingston, from the committee appointed to correspond with the agent of this colony at the court of Great Britain, acquainted the house, that the committee conceived it expedient that one or more members should be added to the said committee to correspond with the said agent about the affairs of this colony.

Ordered, That Robert R. Livingston, esq. be added to, and be made one of the said committee of correspondence.

DIE JOVIS, 9h, A. M. the 18th October, 1764.

Ordered, that the said committee appointed to correspond with the said agent, be also a committee during the recess of the house, to write to and correspond with the several assemblies or committees of assemblies on this continent, on the subject matter of the act, commonly called the stamp act, of the act restraining paper bills of credit in the colonies, from being a legal tender, and of the several other acts of parliament lately passed, with relation to the trade of the northern colonies: and also on the subject of the impending dangers, which threaten the colonies of being taxed by laws to be passed in Great Britain.

Extract from compared and examined with the records of "the proceedings of the general assembly of the colony of New-York.

By ABRAHAM LOTT, Clerk.

From the colony of New Jersey ROBERT OGDEN, HENDRICK FISHER, and

JOSEPH BORDEN, Esqrs.

Who produced the following appointment, viz :

At a meeting of a large number of the representatives of the colony of New-Jersey at the house of Robert Sproul, October,3d, 1765:

At the desire of the speaker of the house of representatives as aforesaid, and at the earnest request of many of our constituents, to consider of some method for humbly, loyally and dutifully joining in a petition to his majesty, that he would be graciously pleased to recommend to the parliament of Great Britain to redress our grievances by repealing several of the late acts of parliament,affecting the northern colonies, particularly that called the stamp act.

Robert Odgen, esq. Hendrick Fisher, esq. and Joseph Borden, esq. were directed to attend at the congress now met at New-York, and join the measures there to be concluded, for the purposes aforesaid, and to make report of their proceedings therein, at the next meeting of the general assembly.

Signed by order, JOHN LAWRENCE.

From the province of Pennsylvania JOHN DICKINSON, JOHN MORTON, and

GEORGE BRYAN, Esqrs.

Who produced the following appointment in general assembly, September 11th, 1765, A.M.

The house resumed the consideration of their resolution of yesterday, to appoint a committee of three or more of their members, to attend the general congress of committees from the several assemblies on this continent, to be held at New-York on the first of October next, and, after some time spent therein,

Resolved, That Mr. Speaker, Mr. Dickinson, Mr. Bryan and Mr. Morton be, and they are, hereby, nominated and appointed to that service.

A true extract from the journals,

CHARLES MOORE.

Clerk of the assembly.

Extract from the journals of the house of representatives for the province of Pennsylvania:

Wednesday, September 11th, 1765, A.M.--

The committee appointed to prepare instructions for the deputies nominated by this house to attend the proposed congress at New-York on the first of next month, reported an essay for that purpose, which they presented to the chair; and the same being read and agreed to by the house, follows in these words, viz :

Instructions to the committee appointed to meet the committees of the other British continental colonies, at New-York:

It is desired by the house that you shall, with the committees that have been appointed by the several British colonies on this continent to meet at New-York, consult together on the present circumstances of the colonies, and the difficulties they are and must be reduced to, by the late acts of parliament for the levying duties and taxes upon these colonies; and join with the said committees in loyal and dutiful addresses to the king and to the two houses of parliament, humbly representing the condition of these colonies, and imploring relief, by a repeal of the said acts; and you are strictly required to take care that such addresses in which you join, are drawn up in the most decent and respectful terms; so also avoid every expression that can give the least offence to his majesty or to either house of parliament.

You are also directed to make report of your proceedings herein to the succeeding assembly.

A true extract from the journals,

CHARLES MOORE,

Clerk of the assembly.

September 26th, 1765.

From the government of the counties of New Castle, Kent and Sussex,

on Delaware CAESAR RODNEY, and THOMAS M’KEAN, Esqrs.

Whose appointment are as follows, viz:

Ceasar Rodney and Thomas M'Kean, esqrs. appeared from the government of the counties of New Castle, Kent and Sussex, upon Delaware, and informed this congress, that the representatives of the said government could not meet in general assembly after the above letter was wrote, and before the first day of this instant: that the said assembly consists only of eighteen members, fifteen of whom have appointed the other three to attend here, &c. by three several instruments of writing, which are in the words following, to wit:

To all whom these presents may come:

KNOW YE, That we, the subscribers, five of the representatives of the freemen of the government of the counties of New-Castle, Kent and Sussex, upon Delaware, sensible of the weighty and oppressive taxes imposed upon the good people of this government by divers late acts of parliament, and of the great infringement of the liberties and just established rights of all his majesty's colonies on this continent, occasioned by the late measures in England ; and being of opinion that the method proposed by the honorable house of assembly of the province of Massachusetts-Bay is the most likely to obtain a redress of these grievances ; and, taking into consideration the misfortune we, at present, labor under, in not having it in our power to convene, as a house, and, in a regular manner, to appoint a committee: yet, zealous for the happiness of our constituents, think it our duty, in this way, to serve them as much as in us lies, (assured of the hearty approbation of any future house of assembly of this government); and, therefore, do hereby nominate and appoint Jacob Kollock, Thomas M’Kean and Caesar Rodney, esqrs. three of the representatives of the same government, a committee, to repair to the city of New-York, on the first day in October next, and there to join with the committee sent by the other provinces, in one united and loyal petition to his majesty, and remonstrance to the honorable house of commons of Great Britain, against the aforesaid acts of parliament, therein dutifully, yet most firmly, asserting the colonies’ right of exclusion from parliamentary taxation; and praying that they may not, in any instance, be stripped of the ancient and most valuable privilege of a trial by their peers, and most humbly imploring relief.

In testimony whereof, we have hereunto set our hands, at New-Castle, the twenty-first clay of September, Anno que Domini, 1765.

EVAN RICE,

THOMAS COOK,

WILLIAM ARMSTRONG,

GEORGE MONROE,

JOHN EVANS.

Kent county, to wit:

WE, whose names are here underwritten, members of the general assembly of the government of the counties of New-Castle, Kent and Sussex, upon Delaware. for the said county of Kent, though sensible of the impropriety of assuming the functions of assemblymen during the recess of our house, yet, zealous to concur in any measure which may be productive of advantage to this government and the other British colonies on this continent of America in general, have appointed, and, as much as in us lies, do appoint, Jacob Kollock, esq. Caesar Rodney, esq. and Thomas M'Kean, esq. members of said assembly, to be a committee to meet with the other committees already appointed, or to be appointed, by the several and respective assemblies of said other colonies, at the city of New-York, on the first Tuesday in October next, in conjunction with the other committees, to consider of the present distressful circumstances of the said colonies, occasioned, in some measure, (as we apprehend), by several late acts of parliament, and to join with them in an humble address to his most gracious majesty, and the parliament of Great Britain, for the redress of our grievances, or in any other expedient that shall be agreed on, by the said committees, which may tend to promote the utility and welfare of the British dominions in America.

JOHN VINING,

JOHN CATON,

JOHN BARNS,

WILLIAM KILLEN,

VINCENT LOCKERMAN.

September 13th, 1765.

Sussex county, to wit:

WE, whose names are here underwritten, members of the general assembly of the government of the counties of New-Castle, Kent and Sussex, upon Delaware, for the said county of Sussex, though sensible of the impropriety of assuming the functions of assemblymen during the recess of our house, yet, zealous to concur in any measure which may be productive of advantage to this government and the other colonies on the continent of America in general, have appointed, and, as much as in us lies, do appoint Jacob Kollock, esq. Caesar Rodney, esq. and Thomas M'Kean, esq. members of the said assembly, to be a committee to meet with the other committees already appointed, or to be appointed, by the several and respective assemblies of the said other colonies, at the city of New-York, on the first Tuesday in October next, in conjunction with the said other committees, to consider of the present distressful circumstances of the said colonies, occasioned, in some measure, (as we apprehend), by several late acts of parliament; and to join with them in an humble address to his most gracious majesty and the parliament of Great Britain for redress of our grievances; or on any other expedient, that shall be agreed on by the said committees, which may tend to promote the utility and welfare of the British dominions in America.

DAVID HALL,

BNJ’N BURTON,

LEVIN CRAPPER,

THO’S ROBINSON,

JACOB KOLLOCK, jun.

September 17th, 1765.

From the province of Maryland WILLIAM MURDOCK, EDWARD TILGHMAN, and

THOMAS RINGGOLD, Esqrs.

Instructions from the honorable the lower house of assembly of the province of Maryland.

To William Murdock, Edward Tilghman and Thomas Ringgold, esqrs. a committee appointed to join the several committees from the several colonies in America, at New-York :

Gentlemen—You are to repair immediately to the city of New-York, in the province of New-York, and there join with the committees from the houses of representatives of the other colonies, in a general and united, loyal and humble representation to his majesty and the British parliament, of the circumstances and condition of the British colonies and plantations, and to pray relief from the burthens and restraints lately laid on their trade and commerce, and especially from the taxes imposed by an act of the last session of parliament granting and applying certain stamp duties and other duties in the British colonies and plantations in America, whereby they are deprived, in some instances, of that invaluable privilege of Englishmen and British subjects—trials by juries, that you take care that such representation shall humbly and decently, but expressly, contain an assertion of the rights of the colonies to be exempt from all and every taxation and imposition upon their persons and properties to which they do not consent in a legislative way, either by themselves or by their representatives, by them freely chosen and appointed.

Signed by order of the house,

ROBERT LLOYD, Speaker.

From the province of South Carolina THOMAS LYNCH, CHRISTOPHER GADSDEN, and

JOHN RUTLEDGE, Esqrs.

Who produced the following appointment:

Thursday, 25th July, 1765.—The house, (according to order), took into consideration the letter from the speaker of the house of representatives of the----of Massachusetts-bay, laid before them on Friday last—and, debate arising thereon, and some time spent therein, Ordered, That the said letter be referred to a committee of the following gentlemen, viz:

capt. Gadsden, Mr. Wright, Mr. Gaillard, Mr. Wragg, Mr. Parsons, Mr. Pinckney, colonel Lawrence, Mr. Rutledge, Mr. Manigault and Mr. Drayton.

Friday, 26th July, 1765.—Captain Gadsden reported, from the committee appointed to consider of the letter sent from the speaker of the house of representatives of the province of Massachusetts-bay to the speaker of this house, and to report their opinion thereupon of the expediency and utility of the measures therein proposed, and the best means of effecting the relief therein mentioned:

That they are of opinion the measure therein proposed is prudent and necessary, and therefore recommend to the house to send a committee to meet the committees from the houses of representatives or burgesses of the several British colonies on the continent, at New-York, on the first Tuesday in October next.

That the said committee be ordered to consult there, with those other committees, on the present circumstances of the colonies, and the difficulties which they are and must be reduced to, by the operation of the acts of parliament for levying duties and taxes on the colonies, and to consider of a general and united, loyal and humble representation of their condition to his majesty. and the parliament, and to implore relief that the result of their consultation shall, at their return, be immediately laid before the house, to be confirmed or not, as the house shall think proper.

And the said report being delivered in at the clerk’s table and read a second time, the question was severally put, that the house do agree to the first, second and third paragraphs of this report ; It was resolved in the affirmative.

Friday, 2d August, 1765.—Motion being made, Resolved, that this house will provide a sum sufficient to defray the charges and expenses of a committee of three gentlemen on account of their going to, convening at, and returning from the meeting of the several committees proposed to assemble at New-York on the 1st Tuesday in October next, to consult there with those other committees on the present circumstances of the colonies, and the difficulties which they are and must be reduced to by the operation of the acts of parliament for levying duties and taxes on the colonies, and to consider of a general, united, dutiful, loyal, and humble representation of their condition to his majesty and the parliament, and to implore relief.

Ordered, That the public treasurer do advance out of any monies in his hands, to the said committee, a sum not exceeding six-hundred pounds sterling, for the purpose aforesaid.

Resolved, That this house will reimburse the treasurer the said sum.

Ordered That the following gentlemen be appointed a committee for the purpose aforesaid, viz : Mr. Thomas Lynch, Mr. Christopher Gadsden and Mr. John Rutledge.

Thursday, 8th August, 1765.—Ordered, That the said speaker inform Thomas Lynch, Christopher Gadsden and John Rutledge, esquires, that they are appointed a committee to meet the committees of the several other colonies on the continent, on the first Tuesday in October next, at New York; and that he do acquaint them it is the desire of the house, that they repair to New York on the said first Tuesday in October next, for the purpose mentioned in the report of the committee, as agreed to by this house on Friday the 26th day of July last.

Ordered, That three copies of the proceedings of this house relative to the said matter, be made out and signed by the speaker, and that he deliver one of the said copies to each of the said gentlemen.

RAW. LOWNDES, Speaker.

Then the said committees proceeded to choose a chairman by ballot; and TIMOTHY RUGGLES, esq. on sorting and counting the votes, appeared to have a majority-and thereupon was placed in the chair.

Resolved, nem. con. Tha

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